radical media rebellious communication and social movements pdf

Radical Media Rebellious Communication And Social Movements Pdf

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The renewal in communication forms transforms media, traditional institutions and the structuring dynamics of the political arena, like the opposition or the expression of alternative ideas. Mobilized in a wide variety of situations, they have become both an essential element in the toolkit of field actors and a mandatory component of discourses regarding the transformation of democracy and public space. This phenomenon leads to obscuring the diversity of the political, social and technical projects it encompasses.

The first and second sections are original to this new edition. The first section explores social and cultural theory in order to argue that radical media should be a central part of our understanding of media in history. The second section weaves an historical and international tapestry of radical media to illustrate their centrality and diversity, from dance and graffiti to video and the internet and from satirical prints and street theatre to culture-jamming, subversive song, performance art and underground radio.

Social Movements Seen as Radical Political Actors: The Case of the Polish Tenants’ Movement

This article casts new light on the processes of collective claims and identity formation in social movements, with the help of the radical political framework of Laclau and Mouffe Hegemony and socialist strategy: towards a radical democratic politics, Verso, London, The very fact of mobilization of a socially and economically deprived group demanding the right to the city is provocative in the studied context. The contribution of this article is twofold: it combines social movement theory with radical political framework and fills the empirical gap in the body of literature on social movements in post-socialist Europe. Die Tatsache, dass sich eine sozial und wirtschaftlich benachteiligte Gruppe mobilisiert und ihren Anspruch auf die Stadt geltend macht, gilt in dem untersuchten Kontext als provokativ. Historically, social movements have demonstrated the capability of bringing about change in the perception of certain social issues. Koopmans argued that what is perceived as radical in a society often depends on the state and its responses. Importantly, in order to become a challenge to the status quo, even radical social movements need to articulate their collective claims and identity within the frames of the existing order Polletta and Jasper ; Tarrow

Robert A. Community broadcasting can be seen as an important pillar of a broader, and increasingly global, process — that of media democratization. What do we mean by that term? Both ideologically and historically, the expansion of communication rights has often been a by-product of the energies of social movements that seek to tell the suppressed stories of the people, and advance their interests Traber, Historically, counter-hegemonic movements have built radical media that contest not only the social order but also, implicitly at least, the dominant means of public communication Downing et al, In recent decades, and particularly the past several years, such radical media have been joined by media reform advocacy groups that consciously seek not only to use communications media to pursue their primary political goals, but rather, directly and explicitly, to transform the media system as such. Such movements are responding to regimes that deny popular communication rights, and thereby inhibit the prospects of success for progressive social movements.

This is an entirely new edition of the author's study originally published by South End Press of radical media and movements. The first and second sections are original to this new edition. The first section explores social and cultural theory in order to argue that radical media should be a central part of our understanding of media in history. The second section weaves an historical and international tapestry of radical media to illustrate their centrality and diversity, from dance and graffiti to video and the internet and from satirical prints and street theatre to culture-jamming, subversive song, performance art and underground radio. The section also includes consideration of ultra-rightist media as a key contrast case. The book's third section provides detailed case-studies of the anti-fascist media explosion of in Portugal, Italy's long-running radical media, radio and access video in the USA, and illegal media in the dissolution of the former Soviet bloc dictatorships.

Radical media

Radical media are communication outlets that disperse action-oriented political agendas utilizing existing communication infrastructures and its supportive users. These types of media are differentiated from conventional mass communications through its progressive content, reformist culture, and democratic process of production and distribution. The term "radical media" was introduced by John D. Downing in his study of rebellious communication and social movements emphasizing alternative media's political and goal-oriented activism. Downing describes Radical Media as being "generally small-scale and in many different forms, that express an alternative vision to hegemonic policies, and perspectives. Some media that are categorized by radical media include, but are not restricted to, community media , student media , tactical media , subcultural media , social movement media , citizen media , and alternative journalism.

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An earlier version of the hypotheses proposed in this text was presented as the Opening Lecture of the Annual Meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden, 18 June The author wishes to express his recognition to the Board of the ICA, and particularly to Professors Ronald Rice and Ingrid Volkmer for their kind invitation to deliver the lecture. By counterpower I understand the capacity by social actors to challenge and eventually change the power relations institutionalized in society.

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Radical Media: Rebellious Communication and Social Movements

The transition to late modern society challenges us to rethink the meaning of communication in movements. The symbolic worlds of recognition, power, and legitimacy in which modern movements operated depended on mass media that encompassed distant citizens in imagined communities. Where communication in such movements revolved around language and framing by leaders, organizations, and mainstream media, the complex communication order supported by internet and mobile networks involves more popular engagement in framing ideas and planning action. Beyond expressing the claims of organizations, digital and social media may develop organizational capacities across geographically dispersed and politically diverse populations. Visual imagery, live multimedia reporting, and personal stories shared over social networks may contribute to organizational routines such as resource allocation and coordinated responses to events. Complex interactions of media and social structure thus suggest an expanded framework based on different roles that communication and media play in different organizational logics of contention.

We were interested in how, why, and for what purposes a range of sport media activists are engaging with sport-related social issues through different media. This research contributes to a limited body of literature on sport-related activism, and especially to thinking about the role of media in sport-related activism. Andrews , D. Michael Jordan, Inc. Antunovic , D. Women bloggers: Identity and the conceptualization of sports.

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PenГ©lope A.

This is an entirely new edition of the author's study (originally published by South End Press) of radical media and movements. The first and seco.

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